Conservation challenges of predator recovery

Originally posted on FISHLINE:

A new article, titled “Conservation challenges of predator recovery”, has been accepted for publication into Conservation Letters: A journal for the Society for Conservation Biology.  This article is a result of the collaboration of SAFS post-doc Kristin Marshall, SMEA Professor Ryan Kelly, NOAA scientist and SAFS affiliate faculty Eric Ward, and NOAA scientists Jameal Samhouri and Adrian Stier.

Abstract

Predators are critical components of ecosystems. Globally, conservation efforts have targeted depleted populations of top predators for legal protection, and in many cases, this protection has helped their recoveries. Where the recovery of individual species is the goal, these efforts can be seen as largely successful. From an ecosystem perspective, however, predator recovery can introduce significant new conservation and legal challenges. We highlight three types of conflicts created by a single-species focus: (1) recovering predator populations that increase competition with humans for the same prey, (2) new tradeoffs that emerge…

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Spring Seminar Series, Thursday with Dr. Kevin Bailey

Originally posted on FISHLINE:

Please join the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences for its Spring Seminar Series. The SAFS seminar series consists of weekly presentations by eminent academics, prospective faculty members and the School’s own faculty members. Seminars are free and open to the public.

When
Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 4 PM
Social immediately follows

Where
University of Washington
Fishery Sciences Building
Room 102
1122 NE Boat Street
Seattle, Washington (map)

View the full seminar schedule.

For more information, please contact SAFS Front Desk, safsdesk@uw.edu, or 206-543-4270.

DR. KEVIN BAILEY

Of Fish and Men: The Western Flyer, John Steinbeck, Doc Ricketts, and Pacific Fisheries

 ABOUT DR. BAILEY

BaileyKevin McLean Bailey started his career as a marine fisheries biologist and ecologist in 1974 after graduating from the University of California at Santa Barbara. His first assignment was on a Japanese crab fishing ship in the eastern Bering Sea for 4…

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Aquatic versus terrestrial attachment: Water makes a difference

Originally posted on FISHLINE:

By Adam Summers and Petra Ditsche, in Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology

Abstract
Animal attachment to a substrate is very different in terrestrial and aquatic environments. We discuss variations in both the forces acting to detach animals and forces of attachment. While in a terrestrial environment gravity is commonly understood as the most important detachment force, under submerged conditions gravity is nearly balanced out by buoyancy and therefore matters little. In contrast, flow forces such as drag and lift are of higher importance in an aquatic environment. Depending on the flow conditions, flow forces can reach much higher values than gravity and vary in magnitude and direction. For many of the attachment mechanisms (adhesion including glue, friction, suction and mechanical principles such as hook, lock, clamp and spacer) significant differences have to be considered under water. For example, the main principles of dry adhesion, van der Waals forces and chemical bonding…

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[internship]: Islandwood Brightwater Summer Camp (Woodinville, WA)

Overview: An IslandWood internship provides a wonderful opportunity to be a part of an exciting educational environment. IslandWood was founded on a unique mission: to provide exceptional learning experiences and to inspire lifelong environmental and community stewardship. In the summers, we run 6 weeks of summer camps for kids from 1st – 6th grades at the Brightwater Center, located in Woodinville, WA. As a Summer Camp Intern, you will work with a Summer Camp Instructor to provide hands-on, field-based environmental education programs at the Brightwater Center in Woodinville.

Dates: 6-29-8-17/2015
$500 stipend
Open till filled
[full internship details]

Spring Seminar Series, Thursday with Dr. Martin Robards

Originally posted on FISHLINE:

Please join the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences for its Spring Seminar Series. The SAFS seminar series consists of weekly presentations by eminent academics, prospective faculty members and the School’s own faculty members. Seminars are free and open to the public.

When
Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 4 PM
Social immediately follows

Where
University of Washington
Fishery Sciences Building, Room 102
1122 NE Boat Street
Seattle, Washington (map)

View the full seminar schedule.

For more information, please contact SAFS Front Desk, safsdesk@uw.edu, or 206-543-4270.

DR. MARTIN ROBARDS

Marine Vessel Traffic in the Aleutian Archipelago and Arctic: Mitigating Risks to Food Security and the Environment

Maritime transport accounts for about 90% of all world trade, including 60% of the deliveries of the world’s oil and fuel supplies. Size and speed of the largest vessels are increasing, marine transportation of people has also escalated, and there are an…

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[volunteer/research]: Gillnetting/Purse Seining in Lake Washington

Get your hands wet in Lake Washington with the Beauchamp lab. No experience necessary – everyone’s got to start somewhere!

Lake WashingtonThis summer the Beauchamp lab will be pretty busy with two types of sampling on Lake Washington. I would love to have some help and share the fun of this fieldwork since it is so close to campus. Continue reading

Spring Seminar Series, Thursday with Dr. Brad Hanson

Originally posted on FISHLINE:

Please join the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences for its Spring Seminar Series. The SAFS seminar series consists of weekly presentations by eminent academics, prospective faculty members and the School’s own faculty members. Seminars are free and open to the public.

When
Thursday, May 7, 2015 at 4 PM
Social immediately follows

Where
University of Washington
Fishery Sciences Building
Room 102
1122 NE Boat Street
Seattle, Washington (map)

View the full seminar schedule.

For more information, please contact SAFS Front Desk, safsdesk@uw.edu, or 206-543-4270.

DR. BRAD HANSON

Piecing together the diet of Southern Resident Killer Whales from fish scales, tissue biopsies, and poop

 ABOUT DR. HANSON

Hanson

Brad Hanson joined the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in April of 2003. Previously, Brad worked as a Wildlife Biologist at the National Marine Mammal Laboratory in Seattle, WA. Brad received a Ph.D. from the University of Washington where he worked…

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